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  Santa Cruz Parent Santa Cruz, CA

November 7, 2014
Quality Farming

How to Make Butter

Viva: Five Sites That Will Earn You Money for Your School or Charity

Jeffery Luhn: Secret Trick for Getting A Swing Shot
Ask Nicole: Parenting A Child with Special Needs
This Week
Ag History Pop Up Museum
Ask Nicole: Parenting A Child with Special Needs
Click to view our Business Directory
  Quality Farming

(Photos General) FarmingKids.jpgHow fortunate we are to live in a community so aware of quality farming = quality food, and some of that farming is backyard/frontyard style!  Show up at MAH on Saturday for the Ag History Pop Up Museum and share your gardening experience! Pick up some ideas for fall/winter gardens. Hands in the soil can be very grounding and that's good for kids and parents!

Have you ever made butter?  We include an easy recipe from Ag History! Yum!  Viva's research might just give your school one more way to raise funds.  Jeffery Luhn has another photography technique for you.  Will you please send us one of your successful photos?!

Thank you for your interest in our newsletter. Please, drop us a line anytime and recommend us to a friend.  Apologies for the late delivery --server challenge.

Have a lovely fall weekend with your family, Parmalee

 

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  How to Make Butter

Making Butter

By Ag History, 2014

(Photos General) Butter.jpgMaking delicately delicious butter at home is so easy, it's surprising that butter making isn't more popular. All you need is some high quality cream, a pinch of salt (optional), a cheesecloth or clean napkin, a strainer, and something that can mix the cream together vigorously (stand mixer/food processor/blender).

There are many methods for making butter, but all methods involve the same set of ingredients and the same technique of vigorously whisking the cream until it becomes a solid. For the purpose of this post we will assume you are using a stand/hand mixer.

1. Pour your cream into a cold mixing bowl, and whisk the cream at a medium speed until the butter separates from the cream. This will take roughly 5-10 minutes.

2. Place your cheesecloth or clean napkins over your strainer and then slowly pour the buttermilk through the strainer, holding the butter back with a spoon. Once all of the buttermilk has been removed, place the butter back into the mixing bowl and whisk it together for about another minute to further remove the buttermilk. Then again, strain out the remaining buttermilk, and return the butter to the mixing bowl.

3. Fill the butter bowl with some ice cold water, and knead the butter to force out as much buttermilk as possible. It's important to remove all of the buttermilk from the butter as the buttermilk will cause it to spoil. Initially the water will be very cloudy (that is the buttermilk leaving the butter) strain out the cloudy water, add more ice water, and repeat this process until the water is completely clear after kneading the butter.

4. After straining out all of the ice water, return the butter to your mixing bowl, lightly sprinkle in some salt, and knead it into the butter. This step is optional but recommended as salt is a natural preservative and will keep your butter fresh for much longer.

5. Pack your butter into a jar, old yogurt container, or roll it and shape it using wax or parchment paper.

6. Enjoy your delicious, homemade butter!

 

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  Viva: Five Sites That Will Earn You Money for Your School or Charity

(Photos General) VivaGravatar.jpgThese five websites make it easy to give a little extra financial support to the school or charity of your choice. These sites function on essentially the same concept as the money-saving cash-back websites I've written about, in the sense that each site is a portal through which you visit your target site ("target site" being the website that you wish to make purchases from, such as Amazon or Gap).  Your purchases at the target website are tracked, and then a percentage of those purchases are donated to the school or charity of your choice.

  1. First up is eScrip, which transfers a percentage of your purchase amount to schools and youth organizations.  Make sure your school or youth organization is registered with eScrip, and use their assigned custom link for shopping.  My daughter's elementary school receives 1.2% of eligible purchases made on Amazon through the custom link.
  2. Amazon also has their own charitable cash-back program, AmazonSmile, which donates .5% of eligible purchases to your charity of choice.
  3. iGive provides links to over 1500 online stores, and averages a 3% donation on purchases.
  4. ShopAnthropy only links to about 700 stores, but the list includes eBay.
  5. GoodShop links to over 5000 stores, and includes coupon codes to save you extra money.  It also has an app available for iPhones and iPads.

Do you use any other sites to generate donations from purchases?

Viva Harris writes The Daily Citron, a fun blog about setting goals, saving money, staying organized, and enjoying life in the process. Don't want to miss any tips? Sign up for the free Daily Citron Weekly Newsletter.

 

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  Jeffery Luhn: Secret Trick for Getting A Swing Shot

Tips for Getting Great Shots of Your Kids!

(Photos General) JefferyLuhn_KatieSwing1.jpgGetting the perfect shot of your child in a moving swing almost impossible, unless you know this secret trick:  

Get about 10 feet from your child and frame them by zooming in.

Set your camera in the PORTRAIT or SPORTS MODE.

Have an assistant pull the chain to the side so your child swings "side-to-side', not back and forth. This way the child will be the same distance from the camera at all times, and you'll be making them laugh. Smile while you click!

Jeffery Luhn is a local photographer and educator. www.LuhnPhoto.com

  Ask Nicole: Parenting A Child with Special Needs

Raising children is like riding a wild roller coaster with exhilarating highs, terrifying lows, and unexpected twists and turns. Some parents love the action, and find joy and laughter even in the midst of tantrums and teenage attitudes. Other parents close their eyes and hold on for dear life. And when the wild ride ends each day, we catch our breath and get ready to do it again tomorrow.

(Photos General) Parenting_LovingSilhouette.jpgNow imagine being on that same wild roller coaster, but on a deserted island. This is an analogy I heard from a family who has a child with special needs (or disability). The extra time and energy it takes to help their child eat, bathe or get dressed is exhausting. Juggling work responsibilities and parenting their other children with caring for their child with special needs is overwhelming. And advocating for the child's rights while dealing with that child's challenging behaviors at school or in public leaves the parents feeling judged and isolated. But these parents also experience the joys and rewards of parenting, which leads them to get right back in line to experience the ride all over again.

This month's article provides tips for families raising children with special needs, based on the world-renowned Triple P - Positive Parenting Program, available to families in Santa Cruz County. Read more>>>

  This Week

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Events in the Parks

HARVEST & HALLOWEEN

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School Corner

Santa Cruz Waldorf K-8, Early Childhood Education Class TH

 

Gateway School K-8, School Day Tour 11/11

 

Monte Vista Christian School 5-12, Open House & Curriculum Fair 11/11

 

Mount Madonna PreK-12, Fall Open House 11/15


Chartwell School and The New High School 1-12, Open House 11/18

 

Santa Cruz Waldorf School K-12, Waldorf Alive, A Walk through the Grades 11/19

 

SCPENS, Fall Seuss Theme Festival 11/8

 

LitWits Master Class for Grades 9-12: A Tale of Two Cities 11/14 & 21

 

Santa Cruz Waldorf PreK-8, Waldorf Alive! A Walk through the Grades, 11/19

 

Tara Redwood School Pre-5, Call for a Tour

 

CLUBS FOR KIDS!

 

Enjoy free admission to the Seymour Center all day!

 

Come touch a friendly shark, see how marine scientists work, and take in the spectacular Monterey Bay.

 

Our exhibit hall offers a deeper dive into the adventure of ocean research here in Santa Cruz and around the world.

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FREE

ACTIVITIES

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 Ag History Pop Up Museum

MAH
Bring your stories, old tools, gardening tips, and anything else you want and be part of the community wide conversation.
Date: 11/08/2014 from 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Pop Up Museum; Agricultural History

 (Photos General) AgHistory_MilkingCow.jpgA Pop Up Museum is a temporary exhibit created by the people who show up to participate. It works by choosing a theme and location, and inviting people to bring something on topic to share. It can happen anytime, anywhere, and with any community.

This Pop Up Museum, held in collaboration with the Agricultural History Projectinvites you to bring Santa Cruz County agricultural history to life. Bring your stories, old tools, gardening tips, and anything else you want and be part of the community wide conversation.

Location: Ag History Project, 2601 East Lake Ave, Watsonville Map
Phone: 831-724-5898 •website Watsonville

Baby Sign Language Introductory Class
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  Baby Sign Language Introductory Class
Touch Blue Sky Baby Sign Language
Date: 11/11/2014 from 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Ages: Birth to 18 months
Details: Baby Sign Language Introductory Class
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (650) 571-0337 view all details >>
     
LitWits Master Classes: My Antonia
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  LitWits Master Classes: My Antonia
LitWits Workshops
Date: Every Fri (Mar 13-Mar 20) from 9:00am to 12:00pm
Ages: High school
Details: Literature-based writing and art instruction for high schoolers
Special Instructions: Nov 14 and 21, 9am-12pm
City: Aptos Phone: (831) 247-0593 view all details >>
     
Quality Farming
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Date:
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Quality Farming
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Date:
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Mission Santa Cruz Summer Archaeology Project
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  Mission Santa Cruz Summer Archaeology Project
State Park Mission
Date: Every Mon (Jun 23-Aug 17) from 10:00am to 2:00pm
Details: Gain hands on experience in handling and identifying a variety of artifact types
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (831) 425-5849 view all details >>
     
Quality Farming
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  Quality Farming
Date:
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Sunday Seaside Crafts
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  Sunday Seaside Crafts
Seymour Marine Discovery Center (at Long Marine Lab)
Date: Every Su from 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Ages: Kids and up
Details: Join us with your small fry every Sunday for hands-on fun!
Special Instructions: We are located at the end of Delaware Avenue.
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (831) 459-3800 view all details >>
     
Quality Farming
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Date:
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R.E.A.D.: Reach Every Amazing Detail
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  R.E.A.D.: Reach Every Amazing Detail
Library Central
Date: Every Mon from 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Details: R.E.A.D.: Reach Every Amazing Detail @ Downtown
City: Santa Cruz view all details >>
     
Quality Farming
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Date:
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Quality Farming
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Quality Farming
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  Quality Farming
Date:
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  Ask Nicole: Parenting A Child with Special Needs

Dear Nicole,

I've read your articles, and they've helped me with my two daughters who are both very strong-willed. However, I feel like they are "easy" compared to my 4-year old who has autism.  He can say a few words but mostly uses gestures and sounds to tell us what he wants and then gets angry (and aggressive) when we don't understand him. It's hard to go anywhere with him because it's stressful for all of us. I need some more tips - will the same ones you've given before work with my son?

Ann, mother of 3 

Dear Ann,

Children of all ages and abilities need safe and loving environments to become healthy, well-adjusted adults. And just like their "typically-developing" peers, children with special needs benefit from developing new skills, forming positive relationships and becoming active in their communities. Here are a few tips for raising children with special needs:

Spend quality time with your child.

This is the foundation for building positive relationships between all parents and children. Give your son brief and frequent attention - as little as 1-2 minutes at a time. Talk or sit with him as he is engaged in an activity that interests him. Although some children with special needs may not ask for this type of quality time or respond to it with obvious affection, the loving and consistent attention reassures them that their parents and caregivers are available when they're needed.

Have realistic expectations for your child and yourself.

Children with special needs grow and learn at different rates, just like their typically-developing peers. Although that sounds obvious, it can still be easy to expect too much too soon, then become disappointed or frustrated when children can't do certain tasks. It can also be problematic if parents' expectations are too low and they miss opportunities to teach their children important self-care, social and communication skills.

It's equally important to have realistic expectations for yourself. Many parents of children with special needs feel fear, guilt, grief, anger and resentment. This can lead parents to believe they should always be available or that they must protect their children from all hardships in life, which can lead to burnout or a sense of failure. Having realistic expectations is one way to take care of yourself, making it easier for you to remain calm, nurturing and available for all of your children.

Teach your child to communicate what he wants.

Someone once said, "All behavior is communication." This is particularly true for children who have disabilities affecting verbal communication. Yelling, screaming and biting are often children's way of expressing emotions, seeking attention or help, or avoiding unpleasant situations.  

These behaviors can often be replaced by teaching children to communicate with short phrases, sign language, pictures, printed words or gestures. For example, if your son gets frustrated when he needs help, teach him to ask for help by pointing to a picture representing help. Get his attention, give an instruction, and prompt him to ask for help by saying, "Point to the help picture". At first, you may need to gently guide his finger to the picture. Keep practicing this and give descriptive praise each time he points to the picture. Eventually he will learn to ask for help with fewer prompts and less physical guidance.

All children need love, affection, security and opportunities to develop important life skills.  Although their level of independence and abilities may vary, children with special needs can become adults with disabilities who live full, meaningful lives. It all begins with finding a way off the deserted island and riding the wild roller coaster with all the other exhilarated, exhausted parents.

If you have a question or idea for a future column, please email me at triplep@first5scc.org.

Nicole Young is the mother of two children, ages 10 and 14, who also manages Santa Cruz County's Triple P - Positive Parenting Program, the world's leading positive parenting program. Scientifically proven, Triple P is made available locally by First 5 Santa Cruz County, the Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency (Mental Health Services Act) and the Santa Cruz County Human Services Department. For more information, including classes and one-on-one meetings to help parents handle everyday parenting challenges, visit http://triplep.first5scc.org, www.facebook.com/triplepscc or www.youtube.com/triplepsantacruzco. To find a Triple P class or practitioner, contact First 5 Santa Cruz County at 465-2217 or triplep@first5scc.org.

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