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  Santa Cruz Parent Santa Cruz, CA

May 22, 2014
We Remember


With work, less is more

Viva: Save Money on Organic Groceries Part II
SpeechRighter
Christine: 3-DFossils


This Week
Shrek the Musical
President Reagan's 1986 Memorial Day Speech at Arlington National Cemetery
Click to view our Business Directory
  We Remember

(Holidays) MemorialDay_ChildFlag.jpgWe Americans have diverse perspectives on war, peace, freedom. Regardless of our agreements or differences we come together on Memorial Day to remember those who gave their lives for freedom and to be with our families. Most of us live peacefully, secure in our communities, enjoying our freedom, but among us are parents, wives, husbands, sisters, brothers, children who have lost someone dear to them.  On Memorial Day we can help our children understand some of the history of our country, the sadnesses of loss, the joy of family and friends and "the preciousness of human freedom" (Reagan, Memorial Day 1984).

(Holidays) MemorialDay_MomandSon.jpg"Memorial Day, an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer. 

Early Observances of Memorial Day

(Holidays) MemorialDay_Soldier.jpgThe Civil War claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history, requiring the establishment of the country's first national cemeteries. By the late 1860s Americans in various towns and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers.

(Holidays) Memorial_Day_Daughter.jpgDid You Know?  Each year on Memorial Day a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.

It is unclear where exactly this tradition originated; numerous different communities may have independently initiated the memorial gatherings. Nevertheless, in 1966 the federal government declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day. Waterloo-which had first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866-was chosen because it hosted an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags."  History.com

Have a memorable weekend with family and friends, Parmalee

 

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  With work, less is more

by Annie Murphy Paul

"Leisure is the new productivity."
 
That counterintuitive slogan emerged from a panel I attended last week at the annual conference of the New America Foundation, a Washington D.C. think tank where I am fortunate to be a fellow. The panel was anchored by Brigid Schulte, a Washington Post reporter and the author of a new book, Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time.
 
Time and the way we spend it was Schulte's focus, and she argued that we spend too much time working, logging more hours at the office than employees in any other developed country save Japan and South Korea. As a result, "we have a lot of unproductive, sick, unhappy, burned out, and disengaged workers," Schulte noted. Ironically, we are less productive, creative, and innovative than we would be if we had more time off.
 
Our continual state of busyness, she explained, prevents us from entering the loose, associative mental state in which unexpected connections and aha! insights are achieved. Schulte was drawing here on the research of psychologists and neuroscientists, one of whom, Northwestern University professor Mark Beeman, was also on the panel.
 
Beeman and his collaborators have found that although we may appear idle while daydreaming or mind wandering, the brain is actually working especially hard in these moments, tapping a greater array of mental resources than are used during more methodical thinking. This unfocused "default mode," Schulte has written, "is like a series of airport hubs in different and typically unconnected parts of the brain." When activated, it "puts together stray thoughts, makes seemingly random connections and enables us to see an old problem in an entirely new light."
 
If we don't allow our minds to have this kind of downtime-because we're always under stress and on deadline, always making calls and checking email-such connections and insights won't materialize. "At work and at school, we expect people to pay attention, to focus," Beeman observed. "To focus on one thing, you have to suppress a lot of other things. Sometimes that's good. But sometimes a solution to a problem can only come from allowing in apparently unrelated information, from giving time to the quieter ideas in the background."
 
Schulte and Beeman contend that we need to make room in our lives for two distinctly different kinds of mental activity: the directed, focused attention usually expected of us at work and at school, but also a more diffuse and leisurely state in which we're focusing on nothing in particular. "Oscillating" between these two modes-a kind of interval training for the mind-is the best way to reap the benefits of both kinds of thought.
 
"As we move ever further into a knowledge economy, in which ideas are our products, we have to think about where ideas come from," Schulte concluded. Where they come from, she argued persuasively, is not only from conventional work, but from productive leisure.

Brilliant readers, what do you think? Do you have enough "productive leisure"-fruitful mental downtime-in your life? Please share your thoughts on my blog.  I love to hear from readers. Please email me at annie@anniemurphypaul.com. You can also visit my website.

 

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  Viva: Save Money on Organic Groceries Part II

(Photos General) VivaGravatar.jpgSave up to 50% off of snacks, canned seafood, oil, vinegar...

I've already talked about saving 10-60% off of grocery store prices of organic fruits and vegetables; now let's talk about saving up to 50% off of organic "dry goods"- that is, non-perishable items like oil, vinegar, canned seafood, packaged snacks, etc.  It's no surprise from the title of this post that one the best ways to save money on organic non-perishable foods is to buy them online, and specifically, from Amazon's Subscribe and Save + Amazon Mom program.  I'll give you some good tips about that in a minute.

But what about shopping locally?!  Now, let me just say... continued>>>

Viva is a local mother of two and writes about saving money, "I started The Daily Citron in 2009, when I was determined to learn more about how to manage my money so that I could spend it on what I wanted to spend it on instead of watching it be frittered away on debt payments." You can find more of her articles on The Daily Citron.

  SpeechRighter

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  Christine: 3-DFossils

(Graphics) Christine_PRI_Exhibit_300.jpgI wonder sometimes at some of the ridiculous stuff on the Net. Sometimes the Web is the perfect place for some information, and sometimes it doesn't matter. Here is a perfect case for Web usage. The University of Michigan has set up a website with three-dimensional fossil bones. It is in the early phases, but I played with a mastodon skeleton.

This is amazing. The mastodon has 254 bones, all painstakingly scanned for this website.  There is a tool called "BonePicker." This allows you to rotate the skeleton any way you like. If you are a fossil hunter, you can rotate this skeleton and to see if it matches what you are looking at on a site. You can also choose any single bone to look at. This tools allows you to rotate the bone. Again, if you have a fossil in the ground, you can rotate a bone around (and get measurements) to identify some recently found fossil. This could be a wonderful tool to help researchers identify singular bones without an accompanying skeleton.

This website is in early stages. They are still scanning bones and will be adding lots more. I suspect they are hoping other paleontologists will want to add bones to their site. This is the perfect use case for the Internet. Information made more useful.

I'm going to keep this short. Go play!


http://umorf.ummp.lsa.umich.edu/wp/

http://ns.umich.edu/new/multimedia/videos/22169-u-m-paleontologists-unveil-online-showcase-of-3-d-fossil-remains

Christine is a local mom and scientist. She likes making challenging science accessible to us non-scientists.  Visit her blog at Science Fun.

 

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  This Week

(BUILT IN) (Icons/Graphics) Text_Calendar.jpg(Ads Camp 2014) SCPBiggestCampGuide.jpgBelow is only a partial list of upcoming events and activities so be sure to click on our EVENT CALENDAR so you do not miss anything.

   A- Z Summer Camps

 

(Photos General) SchoolYard_WinslowHomer.jpgSchool Corner

 

Mount Madonna PreK-12, Values in World Thought Presentation by Seniors 5/30

 

Mount Madonna PreK-12, 36th Annual Ramayana 6/6-8

 

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May

in the Parks

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 Shrek the Musical

(Special Event Images / Graphics) ShrektheMusical.jpgAll About Theatre

Date: 5/23@ 7pm. 5/24@ 2pm & 7pm.
Ages: All Ages Admission Fees: $12 General Admission, $9 Children/Seniors
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Shrek The Musical  The hilarious story of everyone's favorite ogre to dazzling new life on the stage. In a faraway kingdom turned upside down, things get ugly when an unseemly ogre - not a handsome prince - shows up to rescue a feisty princess.

(Special Event Images / Graphics) AllAboutTheatre_Shrek2.jpgTickets are $20 for reserved, $16 for general, $13 for seniors and students. At Louden Nelson Community Center, 301 Center St, Santa Cruz. www.allabouttheatre.org.


Location: Louden Nelson Center, 301 Center Street, Santa Cruz Map
Phone: (831) 345-6340 •website

Felton Remembers Parade and Covered Bridge Festival
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  Felton Remembers Parade and Covered Bridge Festival
City of Felton
Date: 05/24/2014 at 10:00am
Details: Felton Remembers... Parade and festival to honor Memorial Day
City: Felton view all details >>
     
We Remember
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  We Remember
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Divorced Fathers Network
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  Divorced Fathers Network
Divorced Fathers Network
Date: Every Tues from 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Ages: Adults
Details: Healthy co-parenting support for Dads
City: Aptos Phone: 831-234-5578 view all details >>
     
Parent Support Group: For Parents of Teens
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  Parent Support Group: For Parents of Teens
Costanoa, Ark, and AFE
Date: The last Wed of every month from 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Details: Monthly meeting where parents of teenagers can share their challenges, concerns, problem solve together, and find support
City: Santa Cruz Phone: 831.920-3835 view all details >>
     
We Remember
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C.S.I. - Creekside Investigation!
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  C.S.I. - Creekside Investigation!
State Park Rancho del Oso
Date: 08/30/2014 at 2:00pm
Ages: 3+
Details: Get down and look around as we become creek detectives out on the trail
City: Davenport Phone: (831) 427-2288 view all details >>
     
     
  President Reagan's 1986 Memorial Day Speech at Arlington National Cemetery

(Holidays) MemorialDay_HomeUnknownSoldier.jpgToday is the day we put aside to remember fallen heroes and to pray that no heroes will ever have to die for us again. It's a day of thanks for the valor of others, a day to remember the splendor of America and those of her children who rest in this cemetery and others. It's a day to be with the family and remember.

I was thinking this morning that across the country children and their parents will be going to the town parade and the young ones will sit on the sidewalks and wave their flags as the band goes by. Later, maybe, they'll have a cookout or a day at the beach. And that's good, because today is a day to be with the family and to remember.

Arlington, this place of so many memories, is a fitting place for some remembering. So many wonderful men and women rest here, men and women who led colorful, vivid, and passionate lives. There are the greats of the military: Bull Halsey and the Admirals Leahy, father and son; Black Jack Pershing; and the GI's general, Omar Bradley. Great men all, military men. But there are others here known for other things.

Here in Arlington rests a sharecropper's son who became a hero to a lonely people. Joe Louis came from nowhere, but he knew how to fight. And he galvanized a nation in the days after Pearl Harbor when he put on the uniform of his country and said, "I know we'll win because we're on God's side." Audie Murphy is here, Audie Murphy of the wild, wild courage. For what else would you call it when a man bounds to the top of a disabled tank, stops an enemy advance, saves lives, and rallies his men, and all of it single-handedly. When he radioed for artillery support and was asked how close the enemy was to his position, he said, "Wait a minute and I'll let you speak to them." [Laughter]

Michael Smith is here, and Dick Scobee, both of the space shuttle Challenger. Their courage wasn't wild, but thoughtful, the mature and measured courage of career professionals who took prudent risks for great reward-in their case, to advance the sum total of knowledge in the world. They're only the latest to rest here; they join other great explorers with names like Grissom and Chaffee.

Oliver Wendell Holmes is here, the great jurist and fighter for the right. A poet searching for an image of true majesty could not rest until he seized on "Holmes dissenting in a sordid age." Young Holmes served in the Civil War. He might have been thinking of the crosses and stars of Arlington when he wrote: "At the grave of a hero we end, not with sorrow at the inevitable loss, but with the contagion of his courage; and with a kind of desperate joy we go back to the fight."

All of these men were different, but they shared this in common: They loved America very much. There was nothing they wouldn't do for her. And they loved with the sureness of the young. It's hard not to think of the young in a place like this, for it's the young who do the fighting and dying when a peace fails and a war begins. Not far from here is the statue of the three servicemen-the three fighting boys of Vietnam. It, too, has majesty and more. Perhaps you've seen it-three rough boys walking together, looking ahead with a steady gaze. There's something wounded about them, a kind of resigned toughness. But there's an unexpected tenderness, too. At first you don't really notice, but then you see it. The three are touching each other, as if they're supporting each other, helping each other on.

I know that many veterans of Vietnam will gather today, some of them perhaps by the wall. And they're still helping each other on. They were quite a group, the boys of Vietnam-boys who fought a terrible and vicious war without enough support from home, boys who were dodging bullets while we debated the efficacy of the battle. It was often our poor who fought in that war; it was the unpampered boys of the working class who picked up the rifles and went on the march. They learned not to rely on us; they learned to rely on each other. And they were special in another way: They chose to be faithful. They chose to reject the fashionable skepticism of their time. They chose to believe and answer the call of duty. They had the wild, wild courage of youth. They seized certainty from the heart of an ambivalent age; they stood for something.

And we owe them something, those boys. We owe them first a promise: That just as they did not forget their missing comrades, neither, ever, will we. And there are other promises. We must always remember that peace is a fragile thing that needs constant vigilance. We owe them a promise to look at the world with a steady gaze and, perhaps, a resigned toughness, knowing that we have adversaries in the world and challenges and the only way to meet them and maintain the peace is by staying strong.

That, of course, is the lesson of this century, a lesson learned in the Sudetenland, in Poland, in Hungary, in Czechoslovakia, in Cambodia. If we really care about peace, we must stay strong. If we really care about peace, we must, through our strength, demonstrate our unwillingness to accept an ending of the peace. We must be strong enough to create peace where it does not exist and strong enough to protect it where it does. That's the lesson of this century and, I think, of this day. And that's all I wanted to say. The rest of my contribution is to leave this great place to its peace, a peace it has earned.

Thank all of you, and God bless you, and have a day full of memories.

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