CLICK TO VIEW NEWSLETTER
This newsletter is best viewed in HTML or you can view on our website:
http://newsletters.santacruzparent.com/Newsletters/view/July172014,455.html
Please add info@santacruzparent.com to your safe-senders list to ensure your newsletters do not get caught by email filters.

  Santa Cruz Parent Santa Cruz, CA

July 17, 2014
Take a Hike, or At Least a Walk
Hiking Tips from Wilderness.org

Christine: Dyscalculia - Dyslexia with Numbers

Viva: Paleo Weekly Meal Plan
This Week
Science Sunday: Mapping Marine Mammal Health
Click to view our Business Directory
  Take a Hike, or At Least a Walk

(Photos General) HikingFamily.jpg"All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking." Friedrich Nietzsche

"Happy is the man who has acquired the love of walking for its own sake!" W.J. Holland

It's true.  There's nothing like a walk among the redwoods, through meadows, along the beach to clear the mind, consider problems, toss them over the shoulder and make space for solutions and new ideas to enter.  It's especially fun to do this with family and friends.  The benefits can permeate our beings many hours later.

"An early-morning walk is a blessing for the whole day."
Henry David Thoreau

Enjoy! Parmalee

  Hiking Tips from Wilderness.org

Hiking with kids is a great way to get them connected to the outdoors at a young age, but it can also be intimidating for the parent planner.

We at The Wilderness Society challenge you to get the kids in your life out on the trail this summer, because part of preserving wilderness for future generations is teaching youth to appreciate and enjoy nature. Here are ten tips to help:

(Photos General) Hiking_RangerandKids.jpg

  1. Time is your friend - so plan for lots of it. Kids are natural explorers and want to pick up and touch everything. This is one of the greatest things about hiking - there's so much of the natural world for kids to discover and examine - make sure they have time to get their wilderness fill.
  2. Prepare for anything. This pretty much goes for any hike, regardless of whether or not a child is involved. Always make sure to pack the 10 Essentials. Additional kid-friendly supplies are: wet wipes or tissues; lip balm; binoculars; magnifying glass; field guides (to point things out to kids); camera; and safety whistles for each child (and teach them what they are for and when to use them).
  3. Dress for success. Layers, layers, layers. Make sure that you take ample amounts of clothing in case your child gets chilled while out on the trail. Always bring rain clothes - aside from the wet weather, they can also be great windbreaking clothing. Don't forget hats and gloves for everyone - even in the summer, mornings can be chilly. Make sure your kids have adequate hiking shoes, depending on terrain, this could range from sandals to tot-sized hiking boots. Finally, always pack a change of clothes for each child and leave them in the car for your return from the trail - chances are your children will be wet or muddy!
  4. Plan frequent energy stops. Hiking requires a lot of energy. Energy-sapped kids often equate to cranky kids. Keep your child happy and motivated by taking numerous small breaks for fluid and food. You can also use energy breaks as a way to keep your child moving by saying, "at that footbridge, we'll take a break and have a snack." Chances are, by the time they have had that snack, they will be eager to continue. Also take a medley of snacks in case your child becomes a picky eater out on the trail.
  5. Pick a leader and make sure to rotate. Kids love feeling like they are in charge. Having the children take turns leading the hiking group can help the kids feel empowered - just make sure that the leadership rotates or this could lead to arguments further down the trail. By allowing the kids to lead, you can also make sure that the pace is slow enough so they can keep up.
  6. Make it fun! The key to hike success is to keep the kids motivated and having fun - so why not combine the two? Create games that you and your children can play out on the trail. Have them look for signs of wildlife (scat, bird holes in trees, fur) or count wildflower species. Organize a scavenger hunt and have them find things that are bumpy, smelly, small, big, living, wet...the list goes on!
  7. Believe in the power of positive reinforcement. This is something parents excel at and it shouldn't be left at the trailhead. When hiking, go overboard in telling your child how well they are hiking, how strong they look and how fast they are - even if they aren't. Kids need to hear that they are doing an awesome job, especially if it's their first time out on the trail (I'd say adults need this just as much, really!).
  8. (Photos General) Hiking.jpgLeave no trace. Kids are future stewards of our public lands, so we might as well begin teaching them how to take care of those spectacular wild places at a young age. When out on a hike, make sure that all of your trash is collected - taking a gallon size zip-top plastic bag always works well for this - the "pack it in, pack it out" concept is fully embraced on our trails. To further reinforce this idea, you could also take a small garbage bag and have the kids pick up any litter they see on the way back to the car. While taking a break, make sure to examine the area and see that everything is in its place. If your child dug a hole with a stick, cover it up again before you leave. For more information on Leave No Trace, visit www.lnt.org.
  9. Hike often! Start a family tradition of going hiking one or more times a month. Kids love the sense of adventure and doing something new. There's a wide range of trails, terrain and sights for children to behold. With kids spending a good chunk of their time indoors during the week, hiking on the weekend is a perfect way to get them outside - be it an urban park or wilderness area trail.

 

(Ads Camp 2014) SCPerformingArts_ad2.jpg

  Christine: Dyscalculia - Dyslexia with Numbers

(Graphics) Christine_Numbers.jpgMost people have heard of dyslexia. You probably know somebody who has this condition. But have you heard of dyscalculia?

Dyslexia covers a broad range of problems with words and letters. Dyscalculia covers an equally broad range of problems with numbers. Since reading seems to be intrinsincially more important than math, dyslexia has had more attention and more money devoted to solutions. It is believed that as many as 7% of humans may have dyscalcula. From 2000-2011 the NIH spent $2 million studying dyscalculia and $107 million studying dyslexia. In these technical times, good mathematical ability is important.

Dyscalculia is so lightly studied that there isn't an agreed definition. Some researchers doubt it should be a disorder - they believe it is a combination of other cognitive problems. The heart of the dyscalculia disorder is a problem with basic numbers. People confuse them, or mix them or see them backwards. So there are problems with basic arithmetic. 

Other problems are associated with dyscalculia. Often people have spatial problems, such as confusing right and left. There can also be issues with name/face association. They can also have time problems leading to chronic lateness or scheduling issues. Sometimes music or sports can be difficult, especially learning physical routines. Other issues such as ADD, autism, and dyslexia can be common in people with dyscalculia. One of the biggest problems in defining dyscalculia is separating it from the surrounding noise.

Dyscalculia involves different parts of the brain from dyslexia since reading and word usage can be strong. There is beginning to be noise about understanding this problem. Some researchers even developed a game called Numbersense to help kids learn numbers. If teachers or parents are aware of the issue, extra attention can help a kid keep up with their peers.

After reading all this stuff about dyscalculia, don't worry about yourself or your kids. I have dyscalculia. I confuse numbers, and can't remember phone numbers. Mental math is very difficult. My friends find it very humorous that I confuse left and right so thoroughly. I remember faces, but forget names. However!  I have Bachelors degrees in Physics and Engineering. I have an MBA. I have worked in technology for years. Although I don't know left from right, I have an absolute sense of direction. For example, I have been night scuba diving from a boat and I always know the location of the boat. Who needs left and right? I am an expert at estimates, so I can find mathematical errors in my own or others work.

I see a lot of information about dyscalculia leading to an inability to work with equations. I find exactly the opposite. I am horrible with numbers, but just give me equations. An equation is a picture, and has nothing to do with numbers.  I love stored phone contact lists so I don't need to memorize phone numbers. I was an athlete through college.

Don't give up on math, and don't let your kids give up on math. There are ways to work around dyscalculia. Clearly I enjoy using math and work with numbers every day. If you can get past the basic numbers curricula of early education, math may get a lot easier. One item that I took away from all my reading - every person may have a "better" way to learn. I learn best by hearing about something. My husband learns better by reading. If you or a family member are having problems understanding something - switch the method. 

I found confusing research on the actual specific problems of dyscalculia. Some research lists lots of math issues, not just numbers. I have a serious problem with numbers, but no issues with any other math ideas like equations. I wonder if an early frustration with numbers may lead to these other issues. I don't see much discussion of this possibility. It seems that many people believe that if you confuse numbers you can't learn other math ideas. This is wrong - and I can prove it!

Don't let a number problem stop you from learning and loving math. I hear people say "I hate math!" all the time. I always tell them, "If I can do math, anyone can do math."

I really love math!  Go to Christine's sources >>>>>

Christine is a local mom and scientist. She likes making challenging science accessible to us non-scientists.  Visit her blog at Science Fun.

 

(Ads 2013) TripleP_2013-14.jpg

  Viva: Paleo Weekly Meal Plan

(Photos General) VivaGravatar.jpg

I don't post weekly meal plans because I think that our meals are particularly impressive (they aren't, hate to admit it), or creative (not really, eek).  For me, it's a matter of giving an example of how a fairly ordinary (now Paleo) family plans out their week of meals.  I've always been a big proponent of weekly meal planning, and I hope that by showing you how we do it, you might be inspired to try it yourself.

Paleo Weekly Meal Plan- July, Week 3

Dinners

  • Monday- Merguez Meatballs from the Well Fed 2 cookbook (pssst, you can also find the recipe at the author's website)
  • Tuesday- SimplyRecipe's Poached Salmon (same as last week- it's that good)
  • Wednesday- PaleOMG's Sriracha Cod
  • Thursday- Entree Chicken Salad, which is basically a big salad topped with grilled chicken breast, and finished with a drizzle of olive oil and apple cider vinegar
  • Friday- Rotisserie Chicken from New Leaf, one of our local health food stores.  Unlike Whole Foods, they make one without soy or gluten.
  • Saturday- Crispy Garlic Curry Chicken Drumsticks from PaleoMagazine/AncestralChef
  • Sunday- Beef Stew by NomNomPaleo

Dinner sides are mix-and-match as usual, and include sautéed spinach, sautéed chard, oven-roasted cauliflower rice  by Melissa Joulwan, roasted sweet potatoes, roasted winter squash, steamed new potatoes, Michelle Tam's braised red cabbage, sauerkraut, and fresh salads.  Read more for lunch and breakfast plans >>>

Viva Harris writes The Daily Citron, a fun blog about setting goals, saving money, staying organized, and enjoying life in the process. Don't want to miss any tips? Sign up for the free Daily Citron Weekly Newsletter.

  This Week

 

(Ads) SantaCruzParentCamp.jpg

Events in the Parks

(BUILT IN) (Icons/Graphics) Text_Calendar.jpg
A - Z Camps Swimming Holes Camp Guide
 

(Ads Camp 2014) MusicalMe_Summer2014.jpg

Big Basin

Hiking and Camping

Click here for information about guided hikes

 

Hiking on Your Own

Easy hiking:
Redwood Loop Trail
Maddock Cabin Site
Sequoia Trail

 

Moderate hiking:
Sequoia Trail

 

Strenuous hiking:
Berry Creek Falls

 

Other trails

Camping

Backpacking

(Ads Camp 2014) MakersFactory_May15-4weeks.jpg

 

(Special Event Images / Graphics) CaliforniaRodeoPoster2014.jpg

(Ads Camp 2014) LittleGardenPatchCampAd2014.jpg

Kids Love

Clubs for Kids!

(Photos General) Children_PlayingSecretPlaces.jpg

 

So many

museums!

(Photos General) Ohlone_Mural.jpg

Visit several

this summer!

 

(Photos General) Dog_Hiking.jpg

 Science Sunday: Mapping Marine Mammal Health

Seymour Marine Discovery Center (at Long Marine Lab)
Learn how The Marine Mammal Center tracks diseases of patients like seals and sea lions
Date: 7/20 1 - 2pm
Ages: Recommended for 10 yrs and older Admission Fees: $6-$8; free for members
Special Instructions: Doors to the lecture hall open at 12:30 PM. Lecture passes available at noon.

(Special Event Images / Graphics) Seymour_ca_sealions_nursery.jpgHow does The Marine Mammal Center track diseases of patients like seals and sea lions that come in every year?

Join Conservation Medicine Veterinarian Claire Simeone to discuss a new health map that will create a framework to investigate marine mammal health. Find out how this map will help veterinarians and scientists better treat our marine mammals and how it impacts the public.

Location: Seymour Marine Discovery Center, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz Map
Phone: (831) 459-3800 •website Santa Cruz West Side

Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Wacky Carnival Fun
click to view website
  Wacky Carnival Fun
Louden Nelson Community Center
Date: 07/18/2015 from 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Ages: Families with children 2-12yr.
Details: Come join us for fun in the park with lots of carnival games
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (831) 420-6177 view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
Annual DAY ON THE BEACH
click to view website
  Annual DAY ON THE BEACH
Shared Adventures
Date: 07/19/2014 from 10:00am to 5:00pm
Details: Kayak ~ Scuba ~ Outrigger Canoe ~ Flotation
City: Santa Cruz view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
WINGS OVER THE BASIN SPECIAL EVENT
click to view website
  WINGS OVER THE BASIN SPECIAL EVENT
State Park Big Basin
Date: Every day (Aug 1-Aug 3)
Ages: All
Details: Join us in our historic campfire center for an evening of song and story
City: Boulder Creek Phone: 831-338-8018 view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
California Rodeo Salinas
click to view website
  California Rodeo Salinas
California Rodeo
Date: Every day (Jul 20-Jul 23)
Ages: All
Details: 2016 California Rodeo... Cowgirl and Cowboy Up!
City: Salinas Phone: (831)775-3100 view all details >>
     
Take a Hike!
click to view website
  Take a Hike!
Date:
view all details >>
     
     
business directory | blogs | classifieds | contests | editor updates | families giving back
newsletter archives | parent chat | parent planner | parent perks | contact us
Stay Connected: Blogs Blogs | RSS RSS

You received this e-mail because you have signed up for our e-mail newsletters from our website.
If you received this message in error or you want to be removed from this exclusive mailing list just visit
the following link and follow the instructions. CLICK TO UNSUBSCRIBE
info@santacruzparent.com | Santa Cruz, CA