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The Tyrolean Inn Restaurant - Family Friendly | New Leaf Community Markets
  Santa Cruz Parent Santa Cruz County
Vote with your cloth bags
August 26, 2010
Voting and Plastic / Choices and Responsibilities
And we're off ... kinda', sorta' getting there
Home Learning Year by Year
This Week
Bag It!
A Forgotten Fight for Suffrage
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  Voting and Plastic / Choices and Responsibilities

(Site Photos) VotesforWomen.jpgToday marks a 90th celebration of women's right to vote.  Since most of us women in America have always had that privilege, it seems to fly under the radar of worthy note.  And yet when I read the history of how this right evolved I was amazed at how long it took and how entrenched was resistance to a right we take for granted today. Can you believe that the last state (Mississippi) to ratify the 19th Amendment did not do so until 1984!?  This topic would make for great dinner table conversation --a little history, room for opinion, some speculation on what it will take to bring certain nations into the community universal voting privileges-- so we have included a short history below.

(Site Photos) ClothBagSayNotoPlastic.jpgI was listening to a discussion on the radio about a section of the north Indian Ocean that, owing to currents, has become inundated with floating plastic flotsam collectively the size of the United States.  I do my part picking up garbage at the beach when Katie and I go for walks and I have read about the growing problem of plastic, and try to remember my cloth bags, but nothing has grabbed my attention like that image of a huge swirl of plastic.  I went online and sure enough it was real and not just that particular section of our oceans but many areas around the world. 

There's a very interesting movie on our plastic problem at the Rio Thursday night. I hope you can go!  For colorful cloth bags that express your "style" from a locally owned company visit  Nubius Organics.

We are fortunate to have voting and product choices.  With them come responsibilities.  We get to vote so it behooves us to become informed.  We have the privilege of living in this beautiful world, so we get to take care of it.

Parmalee

  And we're off ... kinda', sorta' getting there

(Site Photos) SukiRedHead_138.jpgI declared to my kids a few days ago that our official first day of homeschooling would be next Monday, but somehow today got to be the day.

All summer, we've been coasting. My daughter has been so into her camps, and my son has been into practicing magic. Neither had any interest in studying much of anything, except my daughter and our Math Stories excursion. I had no problem with that. I may be a classical homeschooler at heart, but my 7-year-old has proven to me that unschooling can, in fact, work. She just soaks things in whether I plan them or not.

However, I have been lying in wait with a few things.... continued>>>>

 

  Home Learning Year by Year

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Heddi Craft, Hands On Learning

Homeschooling families often wonder if their children are "on track" each year. If you are not in a state that has particular requirements, the book Home Learning Year by Year by Rebecca Rupp may be the resource you are looking for. In this paperback sized book, the author describes the basic skills most curriculums emphasize for each grade and subject area preschool through 12th grade. She uses simple language that even non-educators can follow and includes some suggested resources for almost every entry.

The suggested resources are one of the best parts of the book because it's a mix of commercial curriculum, games, kits, books you can find at the library, and even some web sites each with its own short review. Some of the materials are no longer available, but it gives you an idea of what to look for.

Learning is really a continuum- there is rarely an "average" first grader- but this book is great for giving you an idea of the typical sequence of learning. If your age-wise fourth grader seems to know what's listed in fourth grade math, go look to see what would usually be taught next in fifth grade. Likewise, if your child doesn't seem to be quite ready, look at what's in the previous grade listings. This book is a simple tool to help you find out where you are at and where you might be going!

  This Week

Event CalendarBelow is only a partial list of upcoming events and activities so be sure to click on our EVENT CALENDAR so you do not miss anything >>

Use the PARENT PLANNER to click on events and resources you are interested in and click PRINT MY PLANNER to print or email your list.

ENRICHMENT CLASSES

 
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Preschools

Many excellent choices are available.

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Find outstanding teachers.

Santa Cruz

Sports Central

OPEN House

Saturday, Aug 28th

11am-3pm

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* Meet the Staff

* See the new facility

* Demonstrations

*Activities

* FUN


We have a whole new look, program, and feel!

New Classes

* New LOWER Prices

* Convenient Monthly Billing

* New UNLIMITED Options


Our NEW Home is

2608 Chanticleer

Take Chanticleer off Soquel Ave, drive past Sutter Maternity to the end of the cul de sac, take a left and drive straight ahead.


A Full Schedule of Classes will resume September 1

SCSportsCentral

427.3547

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Great
Back to School
Dinner!

Bourbon Glazed Pork Loin Steaks with Sweet Cornbread and Peas

 

Tender, thick-cut pork loin steaks marinate in our special bourbon and molasses glaze with a hint of fresh lime juice and cilantro. Mmmmm!

 

See entire menu!

 

FreshPrepKitchens.com
429.1390

Equestrians

do well in school!

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Back to School
&
Back to the Ranch

September Special
for New Riders

Buy one lesson and
get the second lesson
FREE

Willow Pond Ranch

10 minutes from Soquel

477.7058

Home to Mild Mannered Rescued Horses
Host to Children
Who Love Horses

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 Bag It!

(Event Calendar Logos) BagIt.jpgOur story follows Jeb Berrier, an average American guy who is admittedly not a "tree hugger," who makes a pledge to stop using plastic bags. This simple action gets Jeb thinking about all kinds of plastic as he embarks on a global tour to unravel the complexities of plastic in our world. When Jeb's journey takes a personal twist, we see how our crazy-for-plastic world has finally caught up to us and what we can do about it. Today. Right now.

BAG IT is a film that examines our society's use and abuse of plastic. The film focuses on plastic as it relates to our society's throwaway mentality, our culture of convenience, our over consumption of unnecessary, disposable products and packaging - things that we use one time and then, without another thought, throw them away. Where is AWAY?? Away is over flowing landfills, clogged rivers, islands of trash in our oceans, and even our very own toxic bodies. Jeb travels the globe on a fact-finding mission - not realizing that after his simple resolution, plastic will never look the same again.

At the Rio, Thursday August 26

The Vote and Plastic
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  A Forgotten Fight for Suffrage

by Christine Stansell, NY Times, August 24, 2010

(Site Photos) VotesforWomen_Poster.jpgLOOKING back on the adoption of the 19th Amendment 90 years ago Thursday - the largest act of enfranchisement in our history - it can be hard to see what the fuss was about. We're inclined to assume that the passage of women's suffrage (even the term is old-fashioned) was inevitable, a change whose time had come. After all, voting is now business as usual for women. And although women are still poorly represented in Congress, there are influential female senators and representatives, and prominent women occupy governors' and mayors' offices and legislative seats in every part of the United States.

Yet entrenched opposition nationwide sidelined the suffrage movement for decades in the 19th century. By 1920, antagonism remained in the South, and was strong enough to come close to blocking ratification.

Proposals for giving women the vote had been around since the first convention for women's rights in Seneca Falls, N.Y., in 1848. At the end of the Civil War, eager abolitionists urged Congress to enfranchise both the former slaves and women, black and white. The 14th Amendment opened the possibility, with its generous language about citizenship, equal protection and due process.

But, at that time, women's suffrage was still unthinkable to anyone but radical abolitionists. Since the nation's founding, Americans considered women to be, by nature, creatures of the home, under the care and authority of men. They had no need for the vote; their husbands represented them to the state and voted for them. So, in the 14th Amendment's second section, legislators inserted the word "male," prohibiting the denial of voting rights to "any of the male inhabitants" of the states.

In the ensuing decades, the nation backpedaled from the equal-rights guarantees of the 14th and 15th amendments. Black voters in the South were refused federal protection, and even in the North and West, literacy tests and educational requirements were used to turn immigrants and laborers away from the polls. The suffrage movement itself embraced anti-immigrant and anti-black views. In 1903 in New Orleans, at their annual convention, suffragists listened to speakers inveigh against the Negro menace. Black suffragists met far across town. (An elderly Susan B. Anthony paid them a respectful call.) It was the nadir of the women's movement.

Later in the first decade of the new century, though, an influx of bold young women, allergic to the old pieties about female purity and comfortable working with men, displaced their moralistic, teetotaling elders. Black women, working women and immigrants joined white reformers in a stunningly successful coalition. From 1909 to 1912, they won suffrage in Oregon, California and Washington. More states followed, so that by the 1916 presidential election, 4 million new votes were in play.

"Antis" still managed to defeat suffrage measures in four Northern states that year. "Woman suffrage wants the wife to be as much the ruler as the husband, if not the chief ruler," warned one antagonist. But such views were waning - everywhere but the South.

President Woodrow Wilson, who had been a genteel but firm anti-suffragist, was indebted to female voters for helping him win a close election, and in 1918 he endorsed a constitutional amendment. That year the 19th Amendment passed the House. It stalled in the Senate - blocked by conservative Southerners - but Wilson muscled it through in 1919.

Thirty-six of the 48 states then needed to ratify it. Western states did so promptly, and in the North only Vermont and Connecticut delayed. But the segregated South saw in the 19th Amendment a grave threat: the removal of the most comprehensive principle for depriving an entire class of Americans of full citizenship rights. The logic of women's disenfranchisement helped legitimize relegating blacks to second-class citizenship.

Female voters would also pose practical difficulties, described bluntly by a Mississippi man: "We are not afraid to maul a black man over the head if he dares to vote, but we can't treat women, even black women, that way. No, we'll allow no woman suffrage."

(Site Photos) Votes_Mr.jpgNine Southern states joined by Delaware forced ratification to a halt, one state short.  Only Tennessee was left, and the opposition had good reason to think it would line up with the rest of the region. But after a nine-day special session in the heat of August 1920, a legislator pledged to the nays jumped ship - he later said it was because his mother told him to - and the 36th state was in.

Even then, in several Southern states, die-hards went to court to invalidate the amendment, stopping only after the Supreme Court in 1922 unanimously dismissed their arguments.

In 1923 Delaware ratified belatedly to join the rest of the country, but the Southern states waited decades: Maryland in 1941, Virginia in 1952, Alabama in 1953. Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina and South Carolina came along from 1969 to 1971, years after the Voting Rights Act of 1965 had passed. Mississippi brought up the rear, not condoning the right of women to vote until 1984.

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