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  Santa Cruz Parent Santa Cruz, CA

March 5, 2015


Ask Nicole: Tips for Raising Teens

Christine: Cat Science for the Internet Crowd

Hummingbird Days

4 Tips for a Healthy Sleep Routine for Daylight Savings Time
This Week
MAH: Define American
Nicole Answers
Click to view our Business Directory
 

(ABC_Feb 2015) Americans_Children.jpgWhen I saw the topic of MAH's next popup museum, "Define American", a strange juxtaposition of images began to manifest: my father speaking passionately at a boisterous New England town hall meeting, us kids in the balcony or running around outside; the 4th of July parade in Aptos with dogs, ponies, little, tall, young & old people; singing carols around a Christmas tree as snow gently cloaked us all, then going home for hot cocoa with a marshmallow; my young children and I making new friends at a California park 3,000 miles from family and friends on the east coast; my scrapbook of stern looking ancestors posing stiffly for the camera and looking at me from long ago; my mother's pride in her collection of handwritten pages from her original research of ancestors' lineages including a woman named Parmalee, born in Hingham Mass in 1639; senior citizens (mostly) manning the tables where we citizens, all ages and some with children alongside, came to vote for others to represent our interests.

I asked myself "What do these pictures have in common and the answer was "freedom", a freedom unprecedented in world history, the freedom AND responsibility to choose our own paths, to agree, disagree and especially lately to fight vigorously with words and votes.  I feel so privileged to be an American in this world where too many people live desperate lives without the freedom to do and become all they can be. As our children expand their universes from family to the world, what should we be sharing with them about what it is to be American? Better yet, let's ask them: "Define American"!

(ABC_Feb 2015) ThanksgivingEgyptianStyle-2.jpgMAH challenges us to share a personal object that would fit with "Define American". What personal object would I "pop up" with at the Define American Popup Museum? Perhaps a copy of the constitution from a long-ago history class or a painting I made of my extended family, Egyptian style (for the fun of it) gathered for Thanksgiving one year or my passport stamped with countries I had visited, always with the freedom to return or letters from ancestors or pictures of my brother, cousins, uncles who served our country in various wars or my driver's license, birth certificate, social security card. What will you and your children share?

Maybe your teen cannot attend the LitWits class on My Antonia by Willa Cather, however it's a classic to be read.  I was inspired to re-read it when my hand landed on her Death Comes for the Archbishop.  Oh my what detailed descriptions of people and landscapes.  So beautifully written, I was immediately transported to 1851 and the dry, red hills and arroyos of New Mexico populated with people whose faces took an entire paragraph to describe. Now there is a descriptive talent to emulate in a writing class.

Seymour Marine Center is hosting homeschooling children (and parents) on Friday and offering delightful and exciting special programs. If all 3% (homeschooling portion of school population) of Santa Cruz's approximately 45,000 children show up that will be a fun day for all.

The Weekend   ~ Parenting Support  ~  Parks

Thank you for your interest in our newsletter and for sending many new families our way. Please, drop us a line anytime and recommend us to a friend

Have a great sunny March weekend with family and friends, Parmalee

 

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  Ask Nicole: Tips for Raising Teens

By Nicole M. Young, MSW

I'm an imperfect parent. My teenage son likes to remind me of this fact. Often. My kids know I love them unconditionally, and they are both healthy, confident, well-adjusted individuals. And yet I can be grumpy, forgetful, stressed out and a less-than-positive parent at times. I know there's no such thing as a perfect parent, but there's always room to grow. This keeps me searching for ways to be a better parent every day, one small step at a time.

This monthly column provides tips for anyone who is helping raise children, based on the world-renowned Triple P - Positive Parenting Program, available to families in Santa Cruz County. If you have a question or idea for a future column, please email me at triplep@first5scc.org.

Dear Nicole,

My wife and I don't know what to do about our 16-year-old daughter. She used to be a good student, always polite to everyone. Now her grades are suffering, her room is a mess and she just texts her friends all day. She gives us attitude when we tell her to do her homework or put her phone down. Some days we end up yelling at each other, and then I feel terrible. What can we do?

Emilio

Read Nicole's Answer! >>>>

 

Ami Chen Mills-Naim will be leading a “mini-retreat” on these innate resiliency principles called, “Wellness Within: Yoga for the Mind.”

March 15, 1:30 to 4pm, Santa Cruz Yoga, 1010 Front Street, SC

Register in advance ($25 before March 8; $35 after or at door)

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  Christine: Cat Science for the Internet Crowd

(ABC_Feb 2015) Christine_CatScience.jpgI believe there are more cat videos on the Internet than any other single subject. Researchers also do cat science. A recent study has the two groups intersecting. A study was just published in the journal Applied Animal Behavior about cat music.

A team looked to see if there was such a thing as "cat music." First they selected several human compositions (Gabriel Fauré's Elegie and Johann Sebastian Bach's Air on a G String) and then composed something they believed cats would like.

This music was written in the octave range that was the middle of cats hearing (which is an octave or more higher than humans).  They used tempos that cats make in the music, like a purring tempo or suckling tempo. Cats use sliding frequencies in their calls so that was included in the music.

The results were...Read more>>>>>>

Chistine is a local mom and scientist who makes science easy to understand.  You can find her blog here

 

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  Hummingbird Days

Hummingbird Days - March 7 & 8, 2015

Join us at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum on Saturday and Sunday, March 7 and 8, for the central coast's premier family-oriented educational event celebrating the return of one of nature's vibrant aerial acrobats, Rufous or Allen's Hummingbird the Allen's Hummingbird. The Allen's Hummingbird was voted Audubon California's Bird of the Year for 2014!

Nature lovers of all ages will experience and learn about these amazing birds and the gardens that host and support Hummingbirds. Visitors can participate in a variety of nature and outdoor activities focused on these amazing creatures including:

  • Guided tours along the Hummingbird Trail
  • Presentations of Hummingbirds of Ecuador (and more)
  • Crafts and interactive activities for kids
  • Unique souvenirs, plants, books, birdfeeders, gifts and more for sale

Hummingbird days schedule

(The schedule is the same for Saturday and Sunday)

8:00 am - Gates open

8:00 am - Early, general Birding Tour Limited to 10 people. Meet promptly at 8. Free with admission to Hummingbird Days. Registration required. Call the Arboretum office at  (831) 502-2998


9:00 am - noon - Special Workshop (registration required)
Bird Illustration Class with Sophie Webb, $55 (includes admission to Hummingbird Days)

10:00 am - 4:00 pm - Children's Crafts with a hummingbird theme at the Children's Place

10:00 am - 4:00 pm - Guided Tours on the hour (self-guided tours at any time)

11:00 am - 3:00 pm - Special Children's Bird Tours (Children 7 and younger must be accompanied by an adult)

12:55 pm - Winner of Arboretum's 50th Anniversary Graphic Contest Announcement [Saturday only]

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm - Special presentation: Hummingbirds of Ecuador
Dan Suzio, award-winning wildlife photographer, in Hort II

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm - Special presentation: Photo Tips for Plants and Wildlife
Presented by Keith Wandry

 

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  4 Tips for a Healthy Sleep Routine for Daylight Savings Time

Thank you to San Diego Parent

Daylight Savings Time will begin on March 8, and we will see the clocks move ahead one hour on the second Sunday in March. Many parents begin to worry if this time change will negatively influence their children's sleep patterns, and if so, what can they do about it. Pediatric sleep consultant and founder of Baby Sleep 101, Joleen Dilk Salyn, offers the following 4 tips for parents to help encourage or maintain a healthy sleep routine through the Daylight Savings Time transition.

1. Allow nature to help

A child's body is regulated by different body clocks, or circadian rhythms, and the master clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus or SCN) is located in the brain close to the optic nerve. This means the SCN is influenced by the changes in light throughout the day. Therefore as the time change happens, a child's body will naturally make the adjustments over the course of about a week. Exposing them to the morning sun can help to further encourage this process.

2. Gradually shift your child's routine

Parents who have a solid routine in place for their child, and don't want it to alter, can choose to shift their child's routine in small increments leading up to the time change. Start several days to a week before and slowly move the child's schedule earlier each day, including nap, meal and activity times. This way, the child's entire internal clock is being reset, easing the sleep routine shift.

3. Be flexible

Sleep is biologically based and influenced by internal rhythms, therefore the first few days after the time change may see a child taking a while to fall asleep. To help ease the child into the new routine, a parent can put them down 30 minutes later (on the clock) for the first few days after the time change.

For instance; if a toddler previously napped at 1pm, the new 1:00pm would feel like 12:00pm to their body. Caregivers could put the child down at 1:30pm (which would feel like 12:30pm) for a few days after the switch, to help facilitate sleep onset. After 4-5 days, the nap could once again start at 1:00pm.

4. Protect the new routine

As summer approaches, so do earlier sunrises and eventually morning song birds. Children are more easily roused out of sleep during the4-6am hour as melatonin and sleep drive levels are at their lowest points.

To help protect a child's new routine, ensuring they have a quality sleep environment will be the best defense. Playing white noise in their room and investing in black out blinds can help to promote a natural wake up time, rather than waking too early from outside disturbances.



Joleen Dilk Salyn is a certified pediatric sleep consultant and founder of Baby Sleep 101. She helps tired parents get their children sleeping through the night by working with the science of sleep and healthy sleep best practices through private consultations and customized sleep plans and support.

She is a member of the International Association of Child Sleep Consultants and in addition to her certification as a sleep consultant, also holds a Bachelor of Education, and Post Baccalaureate in Education. Joleen is also a mother to two wonderful children, ages 2 and 4.

Visit babysleep101.com for more information or tune into The Baby Sleep 101 Facebook page for a free live weekly child sleep Q&A from 8pm-9pm CST every Wednesday night.

  This Week

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February-March

in the Parks

 

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School Corner

Spring Hill, K-8, Open House 3/11

 

Gateway School, K-8, School Day Tour 3/11

 

St Mary School, Dyslexia Talk 3/11

 

Watsonville Charter School for the Arts K-6, Information Meeting 3/12

 

Soquel PENS Open House 3/12

 

Santa Cruz Waldorf PreK-8, Early Childhood Education Class

 

Mount Madonna PreK-12, Campus Tour 3/18

 

Tara Redwood PreK-6, Tour Day 3/18

 

Litwits Master Class 9-12, My Antonia 3/13 & 20

 

Santa Cruz Waldorf PreK-8, Mornings in the Kindergarten 3/21

(ABC_Feb 2015) SBDC_Logo_NC.jpg
Assistance for Pre-Schools


The Central Coast Small Business Development Center (SBDC), at
Save NewCabrillo College, offers services for present and potential small business owners.

Janine Canada is a Business Adviser specifically for people starting either a home-based childcare program or center-based program. Existing programs who may be experiencing new challenges or want to expand can also request services.

Janine has owned both a center and a home-based program and has served as a Director of a non-profit center.

All counseling services are free of charge and confidential. This is a great program for all small businesses.

For more information
or to request services:
CentralCoastSBDC.org
479-6136

Ask for Janine!

 

 

 

CLUBS FOR KIDS!

 


Date Nights

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Junebugs Gym
2nd Saturdays
5:45 - 8:45

 

Ohana Gym
3rd Saturday
5:30 - 8:30pm

 

FREE

ACTIVITIES

 

Parenting is "thrilling, exhausting, hilarious, fun, frustrating, rewarding.... and requires constant vigilance..."

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Tune up Your Parenting Skills


March

Workshops for  Parents with Babies to Teens

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Tank

 MAH: Define American

"Define American"

MAH (Museum of Art & History)
How do you define "American?" Bring an object to share with the public in our Pop Up Museum

Where: Mello Center, Watsonville
Date: 03/07/2015 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Pop Up Museum with Watsonville Film Fest on the theme "Define American"

How do you define "American?" Bring an object to share with the public in our Pop Up Museum on "Define American" with the Watsonville Film Fest. It's easy to participate- just bring an object to share. Be prepared to write a brief label about the object and how it relates to our theme, and get ready to share your stories with curious people on the day of.  We will have the Pop Up Museum going during the Film Fest at the Mello Center from 1-4PM.


Pop Up Museum is a temporary exhibit created by the people who show up to participate. It works by choosing a theme and location, and inviting people to bring something on topic to share. It can happen anytime, anywhere, and with any community.

 

Location: Mello Center, 250 E Beach St, Watsonville  Map
Phone: 831 763 4047 •website• Watsonville 
Define American
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  Define American
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Define American
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  Define American
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Second Saturday on the Farm
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  Second Saturday on the Farm
Ag History Project
Date: The 2nd Sa of every month from 11:00am to 3:00pm
Ages: All
Details: Join us for demonstrations using antique farm equipment, crafts, farm animals, wooden cow milking, water pumps, learning to driv
City: Watsonville Phone: 831-728-5898 view all details >>
     
Define American
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  Define American
Date:
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Define American
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  Define American
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Define American
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  Define American
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Salamander Saturday
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  Salamander Saturday
State Park Rancho del Oso
Date: 03/04/2017 from 12:00pm to 4:00pm
Details: Celebrate our amphibian friends that make their way from beneath rocks and under logs to the creeks, wetlands and puddles
Special Instructions: 18 miles north of SC on Hwy 1
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (831) 427-2288 view all details >>
     
CALIFORNIA BABY & KIDZ EXPO
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  CALIFORNIA BABY & KIDZ EXPO
CALIFORNIA BABY & KIDZ EXPO
Date: 03/07/2015 from 10:00am to 5:00pm
Details: The largest indoor Parent, Baby, Toddler & Child Expo in San Jose area.
City: San Jose view all details >>
     
Define American
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  Define American
Date:
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Define American
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  Define American
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Define American
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  Define American
Date:
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Music Together Free Preview Week
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  Music Together Free Preview Week
Musical Me, Inc. Offers Music Together
Date: Every 7 days (Mar 16-Mar 21)
Ages: 0-6 with parent/caregiver
Details: The Joy of Family Music
Special Instructions: Call to schedule 831 438 3514
City: Santa Cruz Phone: (831) 438-3514 view all details >>
     
Santa Clara County Fair
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  Santa Clara County Fair
Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
Date: 03/07/2015 from 10:00am to 5:00pm
Details: Carnival; Kids' Zone; Karaoke: entertainment - music, magic, and more
City: San Jose Phone: (408) 778-6318 view all details >>
     
Santa Cruz County Science & Engineering Fair
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  Santa Cruz County Science & Engineering Fair
Santa Cruz County Office of Education
Date: 03/11/2017 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Details: Come see youth's science projects
City: Watsonville Phone: (831) 466-5802 view all details >>
     
Animation, Technology, Robotics Classes for Kids
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  Animation, Technology, Robotics Classes for Kids
Learn to Discover
Date: Every weekday from 11:00am to 5:00pm
Ages: 4 - 18
Details: Animation, Technology & Robotics Classes for Kids
City: Capitola Phone: (831)662-9700 view all details >>
     
Define American
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  Define American
Date:
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Santa Cruz County Science & Engineering Fair
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  Santa Cruz County Science & Engineering Fair
Santa Cruz County Office of Education
Date: 03/11/2017 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm
Details: Come see youth's science projects
City: Watsonville Phone: (831) 466-5802 view all details >>
     
Define American
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  Define American
Date:
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  Nicole Answers

Dear Emilio,

Adolescence can be a hard stage for everyone involved. Teens want more independence and less interference, so they often test limits or ignore rules. Their bodies go through changes that dramatically and unpredictably transform their physical appearance and moods. Teens often think they know all the answers and are invincible.  

The irony is that the part of the brain responsible for thinking logically, managing emotions and controlling impulses is still developing during adolescence. This means teens actually need their parents/caregivers, even as they're pushing them away.

For parents, the challenge is to remain calm and create opportunities for teens to be involved in setting rules and making decisions. This is how teens develop social, emotional and life skills that will prepare them to become independent adults. Here are some tips to try:

Encourage your daughter to share what's on her mind. Pick a time when you can have a calm, casual conversation. Ask how school is going, what classes she likes and dislikes, what she and her friends do at school, or what other activities interest her. Avoid discussing discipline or expressing disapproval. This is a good time to determine if she is just acting like a typical teen, or if something happened to contribute to her moods and behaviors.

Listen and acknowledge what she says, even if you don't agree with her. Teens can lose interest in school or get discouraged as the work gets harder, as expectations increase or as their social lives change. A little empathy from you can go a long way. Listen and summarize what your daughter said, then check to make sure you understood correctly. If your daughter becomes upset, help her describe her emotions and reassure her it's ok to feel that way. If your daughter feels heard without being judged or criticized, she may be more willing to keep talking with you.

Talk about what's realistic and reasonable to expect. Testing authority is a natural part of adolescence. It's how teens practice thinking for themselves, making decisions and solving problems. Often, parents react by becoming stricter about rules and consequences, or they give in to avoid a power struggle. Neither reaction is helpful.

Talk with your daughter about your expectations of each other. What level of effort do you expect her to put into her school work? What rules for phone time feel reasonable?

Discuss which expectations are non-negotiable (e.g. phone off at bedtime) and which expectations can be flexible (e.g. clean room twice a week). Involving your daughter in setting reasonable expectations may help increase her willingness to follow the non-negotiable rules.

Make small, incremental changes. Although you might want big improvements immediately, it's often easier to start small. Over time, little changes add up to big improvements in communication, relationships and behaviors.

Pick one thing that your daughter can agree to work on improving first - her grades, phone use, cleaning her room, etc. Have her identify things she will try to do differently, then ask how you can be helpful. Talk about what will happen if she is doesn't hold up her end of the agreement - i.e. the "natural consequences" (grades continue to be low) and any "logical consequences" (phone must be off until homework is done). Then, acknowledge her efforts to improve.

Final Thoughts: Maintaining open communication and a positive relationship with teens is the most important job parents have during adolescence. Trust me, I know it's easier said than done, but your efforts will pay off for years to come.

Nicole Young is the mother of two children, ages 11 and 14, who also manages Santa Cruz County's Triple P - Positive Parenting Program, the world's leading positive parenting program. Scientifically proven, Triple P is made available locally by First 5 Santa Cruz County, the Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency (Mental Health Services Act) and the Santa Cruz County Human Services Department. For more information, including classes and one-on-one meetings to help parents handle everyday parenting challenges, visit http://triplep.first5scc.org, www.facebook.com/triplepscc or www.youtube.com/triplepsantacruzco. To find a Triple P class or practitioner, contact First 5 Santa Cruz County at 465-2217 or triplep@first5scc.org.

 

 

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